Archives for depression

Seasonal Affective Disorder and Vitamin D deficiencies among top winter dangers for elderly

The first things that come to mind when you think about winter dangers for elders are probably falls and hypothermia. But the reality is that your elderly loved ones are far more at risk for invisible, lesser known hazards. Seasonal affective disorder and vitamin D deficiencies affect thousands of senior citizens every year and can often be quite insidious to their health. The good news is, if recognized and treated in a timely fashion, they can be dealt with quite easily. Seasonal Affective Disorder, often known by the very appropriate acronym SAD, is a form of depression that cycles with
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Three steps to “catch yourself” before falling

The Fall Prevention Center of Excellence at the University of Southern California is one of the top authorities on falls in the elderly population. The group spends their efforts helping those at risk to avoid falls of any kind. Therefore, they target those who are suffering from muscle weakness, arthritis, a history of falling, depression, difficulty balancing or walking, difficulty thinking or vision problems as well as those who take multiple medications. According to the group’s “Catch Yourself: Simple Steps to Prevent Falls” brochure, the following suggestions should help you or aging loved ones stay on their own two feet:
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Being aware to take care – identifying the risk factors behind dementia

  As we’ve mentioned in past blog posts, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease vary in the sense that one is an effect of the other. Although Alzheimer’s is a disease that to date has no cure, there are many factors that lead to dementia that can be controlled. Some, of those factors, such as being genetically predisposed to Alzheimer’s, can’t be changed. However, there are ways to reduce the chances of experiencing dementia. The Mayo Clinic has multiple suggestions as to how to do so and offered up the following guidelines: Alcohol use. Consuming large amounts of alcohol appears to increase the risk of
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10 methods for caring for someone with Sundowner’s Syndrome

For those unfamiliar with Sundowner’s Syndrome, according to AgingCare.com, it occurs in people with Alzheimer’s disease or severe dementia and typically happens at sundown or at sun-up. During these times, the elder is prone to agitation, confusion or fear. For those who have a loved one experiencing Sundowner’s Syndrome, here are 10 suggestions from Caring.com to help cope with the situation: 1. Establish a routine. As Alzheimer’s and dementia progresses, the patient’s ability to reason and perform normal daily activities diminishes. “Different functions and capabilities are lost, creating confusion and frustration. Establishing a routine of behavior management strategies will not only
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Freedom Home Care offers relief to family caregivers

The responsibility of caring for an aging loved one can weigh heavily on a family member. Often times, these caregivers hold full-time jobs on top of the full-time obligation that comes with providing support to those who can no longer care for themselves. And as many know, this type of situation can produce a large amount of stress. No matter the factors, stress is a powerful force that can wreak havoc on the body and mind if not tended to properly. Although it may sound implausible, taking a break from caregiving is essential to alleviate growing strains on a person’s
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Early warning signs that your aging loved one needs help at home

As the people important to us most begin to grow older, we witness many changes in their appearance, behavior and health. Some of these changes are the natural signs of aging while others should be considered signals that help might be needed in the home. But if our loved ones don’t ask for help directly, how will we know if living alone is no longer an option for them? Encouraging open conversations should always be the first step. Talking with family members, friends and doctors will begin to open doors of understanding for all involved. However, to ensure the safety
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7 ways for seniors to treat dry mouth

As we here at Freedom Home Care have discussed in previous blog posts, there are many changes that individuals will face as they grow older. Although some of those changes are quite expected, many of the signs of aging will come as a surprise. Dry mouth is one of these unforeseen items. spy apps for android “If [seniors] have a chronic disease managed by medications, one of the side effects is dry mouth,” explained Dr. Marsha A. Pyle, director of the Training Center for Geriatric Oral Health and associate dean of Education at the Case School of Dental Medicine in
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Five methods to close the door on Alzheimer's stigma

Every day major strides are made in the efforts aimed at understanding Alzheimer’s disease. The unfortunate but honest truth, however, is that there is still a myriad of misconceptions surrounding the condition. Because of that confusion, those suffering from Alzheimer’s often feel alienated and misunderstood. Depression often goes hand in hand with the already difficult side effects of Alzheimer’s. But some of those feelings could be alleviated by simply talking about the disease with family members and friends. To help open the lines of communication and close the door to depression, current and former members of the National Alzheimer's Association Early-Stage
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What is a geriatrician and how do I know if one is needed?

For senior citizens or anyone caring for an older individual, many of the signs of aging can be quite obvious. The ways to deal with those signs, however, might not be as clear. Whether it be depression, incontinence, arthritis or an increase in falls, a common question is whether the long-time family doctor has the necessary experience to provide proper care and advice. At some point in time, a visit to a geriatrician may be a good idea. But what is a geriatrician and how do I know if it’s worth it to add another doctor to the mix? According
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Alzheimer’s – 10 ways to detect it on its onset

In a recent blog post here at Freedom Home Care we reported that more than 5 million Americans age 65 and older are thought to have Alzheimer’s disease and that one person in the United States is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease approximately every 69 seconds. The numbers are staggering, but the forms of treatment are growing and improving every day. An early diagnosis will allow patients to have a say when it comes to decisions about care, transportation, living options, and financial and legal matters. Therefore, it’s important to look for early warning signs. Although Alzheimer’s usually begins after the age
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