Archives for dementia care

Can Your Heartburn Medication Lead to Dementia?

Proton pump inhibitors. Most people aren’t familiar with these drugs by their medical name.  But they are very well known for relieving heartburn and indigestion, treating peptic ulcer disease, GERD, Barrett Syndrome, and a number of other conditions. In the past, experts have recommended that the lowest dosage be taken as needed because of the potential long-terms effects the drugs could have on the bones, gastrointestinal tract, and cardiovascular system. And according to a report published on Feb. 15 in the journal JAMA Neurology, studies conducted in Germany suggest that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might actually increase the risk of dementia in
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This September is World Alzheimer’s Month

Every September is World Alzheimer’s Month. Launched by Alzheimer’s Disease International, or ADI, four years ago, World Alzheimer’s Month was ignited to encourage people to learn about dementia and to remember loved ones who are living with or have died from the disease. The theme for this year’s World Alzheimer’s Month is “Remember Me.” Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. Every four seconds, someone around the world is diagnosed with dementia. Today, an estimated 44 million people are affected, with the greatest portion of dementia patients living in developing countries. Estimates suggest that another 60 to 90
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Top 5 GPS Tracking Devices for Loved Ones Living with Dementia

Those of us who have loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia know what a source of anxiety and worry it can be. We dread the day our disoriented mother or father becomes frightened, unable recognize familiar surroundings, and walks out his or her home, quickly getting lost. There are things you can do to assuage your concerns like making sure your home is safe and secure, creating a crisis plan, keeping a recent photo on hand for authorities, and keeping a list of people on call to help look for your loved one. But unfortunately none of these suggestions
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Ward Off Dementia By Staying Active

As dementia affects more seniors, doctors and scientists are working harder than ever to find answers.  The results of one of those studies have just come to light, and it gives women another reason to stay fit. The research suggests that women who have higher levels of estrogen, especially when combined with diabetes, are more likely to be diagnosed with dementia in their senior years.  Seniors who have a lower body weight have not one, but two strong advantages to avoid dementia. First, Type 2 diabetes is directly related to being overweight.  The increase of fatty tissue increases the resistance
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5 Fun Games to Help Seniors Ward Off Dementia

According to a variety of studies, brain-building activities help to keep neurons firing actively.  In fact, seniors who regularly participate in brain-stimulating activities are over 60% less likely to be later diagnosed with dementia than those who don’t. With that in mind, here are a few fun games to try that will give your brain a good work out: Use Seven Words.  This one will challenge your brain and your creativity.  Attempt to describe your day or tell a short story in only seven words.  It’s harder than you would think. Play with Numbers.  Bored waiting for a doctor’s appointment? 
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Keep Seniors with Dementia Safe at Home

Caring for a senior with dementia can be overwhelming.  To make it a little easier, prepare the senior’s home to be as safe as possible.  Here are six simple things you can do to keep your loved ones safe at home: 1. Remove clutter.  Limit decorative objects and discard any fake fruit or other material that may appear edible.  Remove any plants that are poisonous. 2. Prepare glass surfaces.  Put a decal on windows and glass doors at eye level to avoid injury. 3. Prepare for the cold.  Keep blankets throughout the house.  Remove any space heaters or electric blankets.  Don’t leave the
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Should You Take Supplements for Dementia?

As seniors search for ways to reduce the symptoms of dementia, many turn to alternative therapies or dietary supplements.  Some companies and practitioners promote herbal remedies and dietary supplements to enhance memory or slow the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. So, are they a valuable resource or a waste of time? It’s really hard to say.  While some may be valid candidates for treatment, there are some real concerns about using supplements instead of, or in addition to, medical treatment. Safety.  These supplements are not usually regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  This means that they are not checked
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The Dementia-Fighting Secrets of the Mediterranean Diet

We know that eating healthy foods can help our bodies stay strong through old age, but are we eating the right healthy foods?  For several years, doctors have been touting the “Mediterranean Diet” to increase health and stave off heart problems.  And now there is research that indicates it can also reduce the risk of dementia. More studies need to be done before there is a definitive link between this diet and decreased dementia, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t start eating these healthy foods today.  Here are some tips to eating a Mediterranean diet: Know the pyramid.  The
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Surprising Link Found Between Teeth and Dementia

When you skip your six-month dental cleaning, you’re doing more than hurting your teeth.  You may have heard that healthy teeth are related to a healthy heart.  But a new study is showing that unhealthy teeth may also be affecting other areas of your body as well – most importantly, your brain. Research has found a surprising link between individuals with gingivitis and unhealthy teeth and Dementia. Gingivitis is inflammation of the gums, most commonly caused by bacterial biofilms, also called plaque.  While gingivitis may not always hurt the teeth, the bacteria may be able to make its way into
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Online Tool Created to Help Manage Dementia

Family caregivers to seniors with dementia often feel overwhelmed.  Although memory loss and cognitive problems are most commonly associated with the condition, dementia can often include drastic and disruptive changes in behavior.  Sometimes the behavioral symptoms are treated with antipsychotics, but they have severe side effects and often don’t work.  These changes can sometimes become too much for the family caregiver and the senior often ends up in a nursing home and heavily medicated. Researchers from the University of Michigan saw this problem and are in the process of finding a solution to help caregivers manage dementia.  They are creating an
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